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Jurassic World 4 locks in a release date and eyes up Deadpool 2 director

It won't be long before we're back in that park.

As Universal Pictures appears to be entering talks with the director of Deadpool 2, Jurassic World 4 gets a 2025 release date.

The official Jurassic World Twitter account shared that the as-of-yet untitled sequel to the billion dollar franchise is set to arrive next year, July 2, but of course zero other details were paired with that announcement. According to Deadline, though, it appears that Universal is getting closer to attach a director to the project. The production company is currently in early talks with David Leitch, known for his work on Deadpool 2, as well as 2022's Bullet Train, and the upcoming The Fall Guy (which has nothing to do with those funny little beans that run around obstacle courses).

Last month it was reported that David Koepp, writer behind the original 1993 Jurassic Park and its 1997 sequel The Lost World, is returning for this upcoming Jurassic World sequel, which will apparently have the series enter a new era, with an all-new storyline. At the time it wasn't clear if recent main cast members like Chris Pratt or Bryce Dallas Howard would return, but according to Deadline the sequel will be a completely fresh take, with neither of them, nor the original cast like Sam Neill, Laura Dern, or Jeff Goldblum, planned to return.

Unsurprisingly, Steven Spielberg is attached as executive producer through his production company Amblin Entertainment, with Frank Marshall and Patrick Crowley also producing, alongside Kelly McCormick and Leitch through 87North.

Of course, the big question is whether or not this upcoming sequel can capture that same Jurassic Park magic. The first Jurassic World film was generally well received by critics, and is the eighth highest grossing film of all time too, and while its follow-ups Fallen Kingdom and Dominion were critical failures, they were both the third highest grossing films of the respective years they released in. Maybe Universal wants all that money, and the critical acclaim - probably mostly just money though.

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